Reliant Donates $50K to Support a Fort Worth-Based Nonprofit’s Leadership Program for At-Risk Boys

The donation will support HOPE Farm's ongoing mission to help at-risk youth and end the cycle and effects of fatherlessness. The nonprofit opened the doors to its newest campus, HOPE Farm – South Dallas, in January 2020.

Electricity company Reliant is committing five years to helping HOPE Farm change the lives of at-risk boys living in Fort Worth through Reliant and parent company NRG’s “Powering Change” initiative. 

Since 1997, HOPE has worked to help fatherless boys ages five to 18 and their mothers or caregivers in the south sides of Fort Worth. Reliant’s $50,000 donation to HOPE’s leadership program will help HOPE continue its mission.

“Having strong community partners is critical to the success of our program. Besides the important financial support, it signifies that established organizations recognize the future of our communities depend on preparing everyone for success,” Sacher Dawson, executive director of HOPE Farm, said in a statement.

Shamar Peoples holds his high school graduation diploma next to his grandmother, who accredits HOPE Farm for their support in his success. [Image: Courtesy HOPE Farm]

In 2019, HOPE opened a new facility in Fort Worth’s Como community, then opened the doors to HOPE Farm – South Dallas in January 2020.

HOPE’s Dallas location is its newest campus and opened on January 21, 2020, with 11 boys, according to a HOPE spokesperson. At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, its Dallas campus had 13 boys from 9 families that represented 8 different schools. The Dallas location is led by longtime supporter and volunteer Leon Potter.

[Image: Courtesy HOPE Farm]

The nonprofit is currently expanding through a new vocational center that will provide young men with hands-on work experience and training, according to a statement.

Through character building, Bible study, reading, math, music, and more, HOPE’s leadership program helps young men and works to end the cycle and effects of fatherlessness. Since its inception, hundreds of boys and the Historic Southside, Hillside, and Morningside neighborhoods have been helped by the program, according to a statement.

[Image: Courtesy HOPE Farm]

[Image: Courtesy HOPE Farm]

[Image: Courtesy HOPE Farm]

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