K2View Expands Data Management Company’s International Footprint

After experiencing 100 percent growth during the past three years, Dallas-headquartered K2View wants to extend its international presence by opening two new offices in Germany and the Netherlands.

Nick Lazzaro joined K2View in 2016 as an advisor. By June of the same year, he was being asked to run the company. Though it was fast, the move paid off—K2View has grown by 100 percent every year since Lazzaro has taken the helm.

Although K2View was founded in Israel in 2009, the company decided to move its headquarters to the U.S., settling in Georgia before moving to Dallas in 2016. 

“Given that we were initially focusing on communications and media, we knew there was a ton of talent here that had the skill-sets we needed. Then as a company that’s taken minimal institutional investment, Dallas also fits the bill in terms of affordability compared to other areas in the U.S.,” Lazzaro told Dallas Innovates. “Of course, it also didn’t hurt that I was living here.”

Although K2View now calls Dallas home, it still has offices in Israel and Georgia. Lazzaro believes K2View is moving into its fourth phase with the recent launch of two more international offices in Germany and the Netherlands, as well as a third coming soon to Israel.

K2View also recently passed a company milestone of more than 100 employees, along with an additional 30 people expected to be hired by the end of this year.

What K2View offers

K2View provides data-as-a-service (DaaS) solutions through its one-of-a-kind data management system called K2View Fabric. Founders Achi Rotem and Rafi Cohen saw an underlying problem in the way data was consolidated when large companies bought other businesses.

There are a variety of data infrastructures that companies use, which can’t typically be easily combined. In order to move data, businesses often have to shut down all technological systems, losing valuable time and money in the process. 

Lazzaro uses the example of moving to illustrate this issue: When someone moves from one apartment to another, that person can’t live in either place during the move because their kitchen supplies may be in one place, while their bed is at another. Instead, that person would end up staying at a hotel for a few nights to have everything they need in one place.

“So, why don’t we just move the entire data from here to here—apartment in this example—and you always have a place to stay? So that’s what they did,” he says.

Rotem and Cohen solved this issue with the creation of K2View Fabric, but Lazzaro says many other data-moving technologies still use an outdated system.

How K2View Fabric works

K2View isn’t the only company that offers data management solutions, but K2View Fabric is the only product that offers a cohesive all-in-one data management platform, according to Lazzaro. 

“What we normally compete with is folks who try to build it on their own,” he says. “So they get five or six different technologies, maybe three, maybe five, depends on the problem, and weave them together, and try to solve what we solve in one product, in one platform.”

“Fabric” can also be used as a metaphor to explain the product. The fabric’s “threads” consist of legacy systems, big data, the cloud, IoT, and other data sources, which can be virtually “threaded together” to form K2View Fabric. 

When a company that utilizes K2View Fabric wants to access a specific data point, such as how to provide better customer care through social media, it can easily access that “thread” of its social media data through Fabric without having to use multiple data systems to pull all of the information together.

Through this system, K2View Fabric provides real-time data with 360-degree access to any information stored in it.

[Image: Courtesy K2View]

 

K2View offers two other products—Advanced Data Integration and Test Data Management—and may have others on the way soon, after receiving another patent last month. With this much growth and expansion in the past three years, K2View is well on its way to becoming an international data management powerhouse.

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