UNT Prof’s Laser Tech Licensed by Australian Research Group

The agreement marks the first time a UNT researcher's patented technology has been licensed, according to the university.

Stock image of A blue bright laser ray on black background

A University of North Texas researcher’s patented medical technology has been licensed by the Australian Institute of Robotic Orthopaedics in an effort to make surgery less harmful. 

The agreement marks the first time a UNT researcher’s patented technology has been licensed, according to the university.

Narendra Dahotre, a professor in UNT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering and interim associate vice president of research and innovation, created a laser technology to replace the use of invasive chisels, drills, saws, and burs on bones during surgery.

Narendra Dahotre, University Distinguished Research Professor in UNT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering [Photo: Courtesy of UNT]

Narendra Dahotre, University Distinguished Research Professor in UNT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering [Photo: Courtesy of UNT]

The technology will enable surgeons to perform operations with accuracy and precision and allow them to leave outdated tools behind. 

“When the U.S. Patent Office validates the technology, they are saying it is an actual invention that can work.”
Michael Rondelli

“When surgeons replace your damaged joint in traditional surgeries, they use conventional tools that are similar to those used in carpentry, and the process is dependent on their skill,” said Dahotre in a release. “No matter how skillful the surgeon is, it’s a brute process and healthy tissues surrounding the joint become damaged, which leads to prolonged and painful recovery time.”

To speed up patients’ recovery period, the laser will minimize harm to bones and tissue and lessen the amount of blood lost during surgery.  

“When the U.S. Patent Office validates the technology, they are saying it is an actual invention that can work,” said Michael Rondelli, associate vice president for innovation and commercialization in UNT’s Office of Research and Innovation, in a release.”To then have that technology, developed by a UNT researcher, licensed to a international commercial partner, is monumental.”

University of North Texas professor Narendra Dahotre receiving a plaque for a patent he has received. From left to right, UNT President Neal Smartest; Narendra Dahotre, University Distinguished Research Professor in UNT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering; Michael Rondelli, Associate Vice President for Innovation and Commercialization in UNT’s Office of Research and Innovation; and Tom McCoy, Vice President for Research and Innovation. [Gary Payne/UNT Photo]


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