7-Eleven, Toyota Collaborate on Hydrogen Fuel Cell Tech

The North Texas-tied companies are examining how embracing the hydrogen economy can help reduce their carbon footprint.

Hydrogen

Two companies with North Texas headquarters are partnering to study how zero emission hydrogen can help reduce emission in a retail distribution system.

Irving-based 7-Eleven and Toyota, whose North America headquarters is based in Plano, are examining how embracing the hydrogen economy can help decrease a company’s carbon footprint while enhancing its bottom line, according to a report on the website, TriplePundit.com

Under the partnership, 7-Eleven stores in Japan have been recruited to help engineer a “low-carbon and hydrogen-based society in the future.”

HYDROGEN FUEL CELLS POWER VEHICLE, REFRIGERATION

The deal covers fuel cell trucks that use hydrogen for propulsion and to operate refrigeration units.

Under the partnership, 7-Eleven stores in Japan have been recruited to help engineer a “low-carbon and hydrogen-based society in the future.”

Toyota has a demonstration project underway in Japan utilizing water-sourced hydrogen using offshore and wind turbines. It recently launched a major hydrogen research initiative with a mission of broad sustainability, according to TriplePundit.

Also, in an effort to reduce store-related emissions, the agreement leverages solar generators already in Japan. And, 7-Eleven is becoming involved in next-generation energy management.

The company will examine integrating hydrogen generators that are based on fuel cell electric vehicles, as well as installing battery systems that can be used for electric vehicle charging. 

As 7-Eleven continues to expand not only its physical stores, but also its ready-to-eat food offerings, a greater demand will ensue for more refrigeration in stores and trucks. That will require more energy, TriplePundit said.

More food offerings could translate into more people actually eating at the stores — especially after 7-Eleven acquired the Laredo Taco Company and Stripes brands — and that would require additional air conditioning.

The hydrogen and solar collaboration with Toyota in Japan will allow the companies to measure before-and-after carbon emissions in real life, TriplePundit said.


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