Zambia Picks Authentix to Help Battle Illicit Fuel Trade

The Addison-based company assists its customers in combating illicit trade and in managing the integrity of their global supply chains.

Authentix

Addison-based Authentix will soon be helping fight the illicit refined fuels trade in Zambia. 

The global authentication and information services provider announced Monday that it had been chosen by The Energy Regulation Board of Zambia as its technology and services partner to combat the illicit fuels trade in the landlocked nation in southern Africa. 

Authentix’s program utilizes unique markers that are added to various fuels. Samples of the fuels are taken at retail locations to ensure that the proper markers are present, helping to identify the source of the fuel.

The company said the covert fuel marking program will officially begin Thursday in Zambia, which has a population of roughly 16.5 million. 

The effort will support the Zambian government’s fuel integrity program and the government’s efforts to ensure a clean, high-quality fuel supply to support local commerce.

“In 20 years of designing and operating covert fuel marking programs, we estimate to have recovered over $1 billion to governments.”

Kevin McKenna

Authentix said it helped the Energy Regulation Board assess the current supply chain, design a program to meet the board’s goals that include enforcement, and to select from the company’s portfolio of covert chemical markers and analyzers, to deliver a program uniquely tailored to Zambia’s needs.

It’s a major part of the nation’s effort to curb illicit fuels that are smuggled into the nation or fuels that are adulterated with inferior products and don’t meet the Energy Regulation Board’s quality standards for fuels. The smuggled and adulterated fuels can include harmful substances that pose a threat to public health and the environment, according to Authentix.

The company said that the program also could benefit Zambia’s economy.

“In our experience operating nine fuel marking programs across Africa, the return-on-investment measured by recovered excise taxes far outweighs the operational costs of the program,” Kevin McKenna, Authentix’s chief sales and services officer, said in the release. “In 20 years of designing and operating covert fuel marking programs, we estimate to have recovered over $1 billion to governments.”

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