Dollars for Good: JPMorgan Chase Investing $3M in Dallas-Area Students, BCBS Accepting Grant Proposals

North Texas nonprofits and educational institutions receive financial backing from foundations and businesses to further their work in STEM, conservation, workforce development, and more.

Money stairs with white 2016 arrow up shape clouds in blue sky.

EDUCATION

JPMORGAN CHASE INVESTING $3M IN DALLAS STUDENTS

As a part of JPMorgan Chase’s New Skills for Youth investment, the company has partnered with Dallas County Promise and the Commit Partnership to help students receive the skills they need for jobs in the health care and IT sectors.

Three out of 4 Dallas County students are economically disadvantaged, with only about 1 in 4 graduating high school seniors from 2010 going on to receive a two- or four-year degree by 2016, according to JPMorgan. Although the Dallas area ranks among the best regions for job growth, opportunity is not equally spread since many of these jobs require a college degree. 

“We cannot look away from this moral and economic crisis.” 
Jamie Dimon

“They continue to lack access to the education and skills necessary to get ahead,” Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase, said in a statement. “We cannot look away from this moral and economic crisis. It’s the responsibility of business and community leaders to work together to provide people with the skills they need to compete for today’s jobs and strengthen the Dallas economy.”

Through tuition-free community college education, JPMorgan Chase hopes to help increase high school graduation rates for students as well as prepare them for jobs in high-demand fields. Its partner in this endeavor — Dallas County Promise — is a collaboration between school districts, community colleges, universities, workforce, the philanthropic community, and community advocates to increase college completion.

To find out more, read here.

TI FOUNDATION, EDUCATE TEXAS & RISD PARTNER TO ENABLE ‘STEM FOR ALL’

The TI Foundation will give $4.6M over the next three years to Educate Texas and the Richardson ISD as part of a collaborative initiative, Stem for All. 

The funding will help Educate Texas — the public-private initiative of Communities Foundation of Texas — and RISD reshape the teaching of science, technology, engineering, and math subjects from the pre-kindergarten through 12th grade.

The intention of the partnership is to create a STEM feeder pattern within the Lloyd V. Berkner High School attendance zone, which serves more than 10,000 students. This pattern will give students the skills they need for these in-demand fields.

“STEM is not something we do, it’s who we are …” 
Jeannie Stone

“STEM is not something we do, it’s who we are, which is why RISD strives to inspire our students from their very first day of school to explore and cultivate their interests to pursue a career pathway through a STEM culture,” RISD Superintendent Jeannie Stone said in a release. 

The TI Foundation made a similar investment in Lancaster schools from 2012-2018. 

“The Lancaster model has transformed the way STEM subjects are taught and learned across an entire district and has improved math and science scores in a district comprised largely of economically disadvantaged students,” said Andy Smith, executive director of the TI Foundation, in a statement. “With the Berkner High School feeder pattern, we now have an opportunity to scale a proven concept to a larger district with a growing mix of under-represented students.”

To find out more, read here.

TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE GRANTS $242K TO LOCAL PROGRAMS

Texas Parks and Wildlife granted $800,000 throughout the state and more than $242,000 in the Dallas-Fort Worth area through its Community Outdoor Outreach Program.

Gray Elementary School of Mesquite ISD received $22,182 for its Flashpoint Outdoor Adventures which takes gym classes, after-school clubs, and weekend activities outside for students and their families.

In Dallas, Audubon Texas was granted $50,000 for its TREKS conservation project; the Dallas Parks Foundation’s outdoor adventures program received $45,509; and Green Team education program at Groundwork Dallas got $20,294.

Fort Worth ISD received $25,770 to help the Western Hills Primary Family Wilderness Club engage 600 people about conservation education. Friends of Cleburne State Park was awarded $9,523 for its SEED program, which provides outdoor experiences for at-risk youth.

With $22,685, North Dallas Adventist Academy in Richardson can support 100 high school students in a week-long biology field school. Paraplegics on Independent Nature Trips in Terrell was granted $46,876 to help its project Making Tracks to Outdoors, which allows physically disabled individuals to participate in outdoor activities.

To find out more, read here.

NORTH TEXAS SCHOOLS AMONG H-E-B EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION WINNERS

H-E-B chose statewide winners for its 17th annual Excellence in Education Awards, including two in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

Lancaster ISD received a $50,000 prize as the winner of the small school district category. Stephanie Miller of Skyview Elementary School in Dallas won a $10,000 grant for her school as well as a $10,000 check for herself with her award from the leadership category, which honors teachers with 10-20 years in the classroom. 

To find out more, read here.

SMU PROFS GET NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AWARD

Southern Methodist University professors Annie Wilhelm and Scott Norris, have been honored with a $100,273 Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship capacity-building grant through the National Science Foundation.

The funding will help them further their initiative to recruit and equip math teachers for jobs in “high-need schools,” within Dallas ISD, according to the university. 

“This project requires significant collaboration between the departments of Mathematics and Teaching and Learning at SMU,” Norris said in a statement. “In addition, we look forward to building relationships with DCCCD, Dallas ISD, and SMU’s Budd Center. Each unit is essential to ensure successful recruitment, placements, and ongoing support for student scholars.”

Here’s more on the project

NONPROFITS/FOUNDATIONS

BLUE CROSS AND BLUE SHIELD OF TEXAS CONSIDERING PROPOSALS FOR 2018 HEALTHY KIDS, HEALTHY FAMILIES GRANTS

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas is again supporting nonprofits that raise awareness about the prevention and early detection of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease.

The funding will enrich health and wellness programs for these organizations throughout the state. Last year, BCBSTX awarded nearly $1.8M in grants as a part of its Healthy Kids, Healthy Families initiative. Its focus is on strategically partnering with nonprofits that are concerned with these two prevalent conditions that impact quality of life and lifespan for Texans.

The first part of the BCBSTX grant cycle concludes May 25, with only invited organizations participating in part two, which goes from June 1-29. Grant awardees will be announced in September. 

To find out more, read here.

PARKLAND BREAST CARE CENTER RECEIVES $15M FROM THE MOODY FOUNDATION

The Moody Foundation of Galveston has given $15 million to Parkland Health & Hospital System for its new breast health center.

Currently, Parkland diagnoses and treats about 20 percent of the breast cancer cases in Dallas County, according to The Dallas Morning News. However, its center is not on the main hospital campus, and treatments and services are scattered at different locations.

The Moody Breast Health Center at Parkland will centralize screening, diagnostics, and treatment all in one place, The News reported.

To find out more, read here.

 

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