How North Texas is Becoming a Data Center Mecca

North Texas has actively attracted data centers for years, and that effort continues to be rewarded, according to CyrusOne.

Data Center Mecca

TAX INCENTIVES, FIBER NETWORK ACCESS PUT NORTH TEXAS ON TOP


The more Americans use the internet and consume data, the more the Dallas-Fort Worth area benefits from that activity, as it is becoming a data center mecca.

Increasingly, companies are setting up their IT infrastructures here, taking advantage of the space and access to energy that the city and surrounding municipalities offer.

Energy efficiency is becoming an even larger factor for data center developers to consider in the future.

Data centers house high-tech equipment and valuable data for countless businesses and individuals. They are often worth hundreds of millions, if not billions of dollars. Data in these facilities can range from social media apps, online shopping, and airline flight information to federal, health care, and energy information.

Energy efficiency is becoming an even larger factor for data center developers to consider in the future. New, large data centers tend to have better energy efficiency than older, smaller ones. This can largely be attributed to new technologies used in building the data centers.

North Texas has actively attracted data centers for years, and that effort continues to be rewarded.

In 2011, Texas passed a measure that grants 10- and 15-year exemptions from sales tax and use tax for data centers that invest more than $200 million over a five-year period.

In 2011, Texas passed a measure that grants 10- and 15-year exemptions from sales tax and use tax for data centers that invest more than $200 million over a five-year period. One reason data centers receive such incentives is because they are not a burden on municipalities. Causing little disruption, data centers do not create high traffic or noise pollution, but they do funnel a lot of money into the surrounding area.

Many companies are quick to jump on the North Texas data center bandwagon because it is readily accessible to fiber networks. The area has a low risk of natural disasters and has low costs of land and utilities. Data centers require a massive amount of energy, and North Texas is able to provide this to them.

Additionally, data centers need the space to have backup generators and functional disaster recovery sites because of the constant flow of energy needed to keep the facilities operational.

LOWER RISKS FOR NTX DATA CENTERS

The area has a lower risk of natural disasters and lower costs of land and utilities compared to some other regions. Data centers require a massive amount of energy, and North Texas is able to provide it.

Additionally, data centers need the space to have backup generators and functional disaster recovery sites because of the constant flow of energy needed to keep the facilities operational.

For the average consumer in North Texas, most of these factors are not considered when logging into favorite apps on smartphones or checking flight statuses online. Data is just expected to work the way it’s supposed to.

Data centers make this possible, and North Texas is making it possible for data centers. 

Follow CyrusOne on Twitter @CyrusOne


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    Nonprofit BUiLT is hosting the event to highlight the success and possibilities of Black tech talent in the region. “There is no talent pipeline problem,” says Peter Beasley, co-founder of the Blacks United in Leading Technology International. “Black tech talent is widely available, especially in North Texas.”

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